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This section contains archived sermons from previous series.

The Gospel of Mark


April 21, 2019 (Easter Sunday)

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Victory over the Grave and Globe

Text: Mark 16


April 19, 2019 (Good Friday)

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Plain Words of Transaction

Text: Mark 15


April 18, 2019 (Maundy Thursday)

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Plain Words of Trial

Text: Mark 14


April 14, 2019

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Plain Words of Triumph

Text: Mark 11:1-11


April 7, 2019

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Plain Words of Travail

Text: Mark 13


March 31, 2019

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Plain Words of Testing

Text: Mark 12:1-44 


March 24, 2019

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Plain Words of Truth

Text: Mark 10:46-52 


March 17, 2019

Speaker: Don Higgins

Title: Parked on a Comma ! 

Text: Romans 5 : 1 – 12 


March 10, 2019

Speaker: Don Higgins

Title: Eternal Life, the Real Thing ! 

Text: I John 5 : 11 – 20


Chapter 9 — Plain Words of Theology

March 3, 2019

Speaker: David Sparrow

Title: Plain Words of Theology

Text: Mark 9:1-3


Chapter 8 — Plain Words of Teaching (February 24)

February 24, 2019

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: Plain Words of Teaching

Text: Mark 8:31-38


February 17, 2019

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: The Work Correcting

Text: Mark 7

It is impossible to read Mark's gospel without being aware of the tension between Jesus and the religious leaders of His day. In this chapter Jesus confronts the leaders and corrects their views on several issues (Mark 7:1).

The context into which this chapter fits is the urgent demand for healing made by so many upon Jesus wherever he went (Mark 6:56). As far as healing is concerned, notice in Chapter 6 

the EXPECTANCY (Mark 6:54), 

the EXCITEMENT (Mark 6:55) and 

the EXPERIENCE (Mark 6:56).



February 10, 2019

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: His Work Commissioned

Text: Mark 6

We follow Jesus and His disciples as they make their way from Capernaum to Nazareth. We are about to see the Work Commissioned as Jesus sends His disciples out (Mark 6:7).

 The opening verses of the chapter(Mark 6:1-6) appear to have little to do with the main thrust (Mark 6:7-44). They are a little cameo that could be entitled The Rejection Of Jesus. We clearly see that the people of Nazareth, His own people (see 6:1), "were offended" (skandalizo) by what Jesus said and did (Mark 6:3). What we have here is the reaction of the natural world to Jesus. It will always find His teaching scandalous. They will always stumble and take offense at His work and the Word. What better preparation could there be for the ministry of Jesus in our own midst than to notice how we are not to receive it. There must not be:

 a)     A Contemptuous Atmosphere"Is not this the carpenter? … " (Mark 6:3).

A carpenter (teknon) was a worker in wood, not a mere joiner but a craftsman. In classical Greek, the word is used of a shipbuilder or house builder, even a temple builder. There is never any need to be disparaging about someone's occupation or employment.

 b)     A Critical Attitude"Is not this … the Son of Mary? (Mark 6:3).

The fact that Jesus is called Mary's son tells us that Joseph was dead, and would account for the fact that Jesus did not begin His ministry until He was 30 years old (see Luke 3:23). Jesus accepted the responsibility of His brothers and sisters until they were old enough to fend for themselves. Familiarity is the cause of the critical attitude; we see that in the proverb that Jesus used (Mark 6:4). We must note that because someone is familiar doesn't mean that they can't be used to bless us.

 c)     A Cold Audience" … He could do no mighty work there … " (Mark 6:5); and again, " … He marveled because of their unbelief … " (Mark 6:6). 

As J. Oswald Sanders puts it, "Unbelief has always shackled omnipotence." What a clear warning to us that we must be alive to the possibility of God as we come to look at His Word!


February 3, 2019

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: His Work Confronting

Text: Mark 5:1-20

It is a familiar story, in some ways rather weird and eerie, for we read in the previous chapter (Mark 4:35) that it was not until "evening had come" that Jesus actually decided to cross the sea of Galilee. 


Consequently, the arrival of Jesus on the other side of the lake was not until the sun had completely set. His first glimpse of the limestone caves and tombs in which this poor, wretched man made his home would be at night. Picture the scene: caves and tombs, unearthly screams piercing the night air, and a man possessed by an evil spirit cutting himself with stones; yet the story is far from eerie, for the central figure is Jesus of Nazareth, whose power dispels all fear and apprehension. It is not until the next day, when the herd of swine are feeding in the fields, that Jesus actually confronts this man of Gadara, who is possessed by an evil spirit.


It is difficult for us to appreciate how widespread and how feared this condition was in the ancient world. Many skulls have been found in middle eastern archeological sites that have been trepanned (that is, with holes bored in the skull). Ancient man was willing to undergo a delicate surgical operation without anesthesia, using crude instruments, so that if he ever became demon possessed the spirits would have a way by which they could leave him.


In the early part of this chapter we see Jesus confronting, changing and commissioning the man of Gadara. He wants to do exactly the same for us. We, too, should listen to His voice as He says,


"… Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you" (Mark 5:19).

We apologise for the high levels of static on this recording



January 27, 2019

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: His Work Challenged

Text: Mark 4

William Barclay said that parables are "like a sword flashing in a great swordsman's hand." Certainly they show the sheer genius of Jesus, particularly when we remember that they were not the careful language of long study, but were sudden penetrating improvisations of a teacher thrusting the truth home to his bearers. And Oliver Cromwell once said to his soldiers, "We speak things." He obviously meant that he wasn't speaking in abstract ideas but rather concrete realities. The same could be said about the teaching of Jesus. Because these realities are often couched in parables, it is important that we understand what parables are as they appear in the New Testament.

 a)     A Definition. A parable is an "earthly story with a heavenly meaning." A parable differs from a fable by having a truly spiritual aim. Parables differ from myths by being absolutely truthful. They differ from proverbs by their length. They differ from allegories by being complete and by nearly always being self-interpreting.

b)     A Difficulty. One of the difficulties of a parable is that it has a double function: to REVEAL and CONCEAL. Matthew Henry puts it: “A parable is a shell that keeps good fruit for the diligent, but keeps it from the slothful." (Emphasis added.)

c)     A Demarcation. It is difficult to say how many parables there are in the New Testament; that would depend on our definition. Lists would contain any number from 30-46. Strictly speaking, John has none, Mark a few, Matthew has more, and the most are found in Luke. One of the best known parables in the New Testament is often called The Parable Of The Sower. Clearly, a better title would be The Parable of The Soils.



January 20, 2019

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: His Work Conquering

Text: Mark 3

Jesus has been immensely popular up to this point, in spite of the criticism of the religious leaders, but now there is a definite plot to have Him killed (Mark 3:6). So Jesus takes to the open countryside, moving from place to place. The result of this is that the work mushrooms. Feel the pace of events in Mark 3:9-22 generated by the word and—

        "And He told His disciples … " (Mark 3:9); 

        "And the unclean spirits … " (Mark 3:11); 

        "But [the text says 'and'] he strictly ordered them not to make him known." (Mark 3:12); 

         "And He went up on the mountain … " (Mark 3:13); 

         "Then [the text says 'and'] He appointed twelve" (Mark 3:14). 

A brief look at this chapter in Greek will reveal that “kai" (and) comes 63 times, giving a sense of tremendous momentum as the ministry builds up.



January 13

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: His Work Criticised

Text: Mark 2

As two young Christians returned to college on a Sunday afternoon, one was telling the other of the fine way his father carved the turkey at the midday meal. The other gloomily replied, "At our house we had carved minister!" It is amazing how easily we can fall into the trap of criticism. The old English Puritan, Thomas Manton, suggested it is because "criticism is such a pleasing sin" that it moves quickly from mind to mouth. Yet it has its dangers. In Norway, at wintertime, the snow on the mountains above the fjords is sometimes so finely balanced that a human voice can bring it crashing down in an avalanche of danger and destruction. Criticism can easily precipitate a similar avalanche in human lives. The second chapter of Mark's gospel constantly sounds the dull note of criticism (see 2:7, 16, 18, 24) 



January 6, 2019

Series: Jesus Stoops to Conquer

Title: His Work Commences

Text: Mark 1

Mark is the earliest of the gospel writers and his writing has all the vitality, directness and pace of a 21st century newsfeed. Using information supplied by Peter, Mark speaks as if he were an eyewitness of the events that took place. Names, numbers, times and locations spring from each page at breathtaking speed. Mark's main thrust is to show Jesus stooping to conquer sin. 


December 30, 2018

Series: End of Year

Title: The Crown of Life

Text: Psalm 21

In this message Pastor David exegetes the psalm reminding us of the victory Christ has won for each of us. To know Jesus is to have eternal life the King of kings and Lord of lords.


December 23, 2018

Series: Christmas

Sermon 03: The Christmas Star  — Matthew 2:1-12 — Preacher: David Sparrow


December 16, 2018

Series: Christmas

Sermon 02: The Search of the Shepherds  — Luke 2:8-20 — Preacher: David Sparrow


December 9, 2018

Series: Christmas

Sermon 01: The Annunciation of Jesus Christ - The Angel’s Message to Mary — Luke 1:26-38 — Preacher: David Sparrow

When God created the earth the Spirit hovered over the face of the earth and then God created Life.  He said “Let there be light”, and there was light. Then When He reached down to man, the Spirit hovered over Mary and she became pregant with the Life of Jesus Christ. Jesus is the Light of the World. Today the Spirit hovers over your life to bring Life to you. Will you let Him bring you Eternal Life this Christmas where you He can birth His life in you?


November 25, 2018

Series: Christian Responsibility

Sermon 07: The “Ought” of Selfgiving

If John 3:16 is the greatest word on the self-giving of God, then 1 John 3:16 is the greatest word on the self-giving of man. Therefore, we are committed, by the very possession of eternal life, to love our fellow men - particularly other Christians. 

No Recording available at this time


November 18, 2018

Series: Christian Responsibility

Sermon 06: The “Ought” of Testimony

Speaker: David Sparrow

So important is this teaching concerning testimony that Matthew, Mark and Luke give particular attention to it in their respective Gospels. Matthew reminds all disciples that they will be brought before governors and kings for Christ's sake,

" … to bear witness before them and the Gentiles." (Luke 10:18);

and Luke adds

" … for the Holy Spirit will teach you in that very hour what you ought to say.”" (Luke 12:12)

If we link those two thoughts together we have The Ought of Testimony. 


November 11, 2018

Series: Christian Responsibility

Sermon 05: The “Ought” of Behaviour (2)

Speaker: David Sparrow

In this message pastor David looks at the behaviour required of a Christian pastor and leaders in the Church of Jesu Christ.


November 4, 2018

Series: Christian Responsibility

Sermon 04: The “Ought” of Behaviour (1)

Speaker: David Sparrow

In this one verse the apostle Paul explains why the Pastoral Epistles were written: to instruct members, leaders and pastors on how to behave in the local church. With all his knowledge of Old Testament Scriptures, and with such spiritual insights as God had given him, Paul was aware of the supreme importance God sets on human behaviour. It is clear, from even a casual reading of the Bible, that God is far more interested in our character and conduct than He is in our service. If what we are and how we behave does not satisfy His holy requirements, then what we do amounts to nothing more than 

"... wood, hay [and] stubble" (1 Cor. 3:12). 

The word Paul uses for "behaviour" here refers to the conduct and lifestyle of the believer, as it relates to other Christians. 


THERE IS NO RECORDING AVAILABLE AT THIS TIME


October 28, 2018

Series: Christian Responsibility

Sermon: 03 The “Ought” of Humility

Speaker: David Sparrow

This chapter opens with one of the greatest calls to full surrender. The apostle tells us that to be yielded to God is to know a renewing of the mind which transforms us from likeness to the world into likeness to Christ, as revealed in the 

" … good … acceptable and perfect will of God" (Romans 12:2).

Then follows one of the most important statements in the Bible on humility. With penetrating insight, Paul declares: 

" … I say to everyone among you not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think, but to think with sober judgment,… " (Romans 12:3). 

Evident in these words is the teaching that the quality of humility is both a disposition of mind as well as a discipline of mind. In the last analysis, humility is the mind of Christ.



October 21, 2018

Series: Christian Responsibility

Sermon: 02 The “Ought” of Intercession

Text: Luke 17:26-30; Luke 18:1-8

Speaker: David Sparrow

Luke's gospel is a veritable handbook on prayer. Again, and again the evangelist deals with this subject, as he records the teaching of the Master. It is not surprising, therefore, that we find the strongest statement on intercession in the passage we have selected as our text. In the 18th chapter alone Luke lists five examples of prayer. He cites the case of a praying widow (Luke 18:3), a praying Pharisee (Luke 18:10), a praying tax collector (Luke 18:13), a praying ruler (Luke 18:18), and a praying beggar (Luke 18:38). 


October 7, 2018

Series: Christian Responsibility

Sermon: 01 The “Ought” of Obedience

Text: Acts 5:29-42

Speaker: David Sparrow

The word ought is one that speaks of a sense of duty. Someone has pointed out that it differs from all other forms of the language, save those of similar meaning. It is a word without moods, tenses or conjugations. It is above time, place or circumstances, like the word eternity—perfect and complete in itself. It symbolizes duty and obligation. It is derived from the word "to owe," so that what we ought to do is what we owe to do. When Peter and the other apostles said, 

" … We ought to obey God rather than men" (Acts 5:29 KJV), 

they were saying in effect that they owed their obedience, their very life, to God. To obey was nothing less than a categorical imperative.